Presentación    
CANCER MOLECULAR PATHOLOGY
AND THERAPEUTIC TARGETS

 
 
Composition
Name
Position
Institution
David Hardisson Hernáez
Jefe de Servicio de Anatomía Patológica
Profesor Titular. Facultad de Medicina
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Alberto Berjón García
Médico Adjunto Especialista de Área en Anatomía Patológica
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Emilio Burgos Lizáldez
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Anatomía Patológica
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Javier de Santiago García
Jefe de Servicio de Ginecológica Oncológica Profesor Asociado. Facultad de Medicina
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Laura Guerra Pastrián
Médico Adjunto Especialista de Área en Anatomía Patológica
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Victoria Maria Heredia Soto
Investigador Predoctoral (Contrato FPU)
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Jorge Martín Pérez
Investigador Científico
IIB "Alberto Sols"
Marta Mendiola Sabio
Investigadora Postdoctoral
 
Hospital Universitario La Paz
María Miguel Martín
Técnico de Laboratorio
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Alberto Peláez
García
Investigador Postdoctoral
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Elia Pérez Fernández
Investigadora Predoctoral
Hospital Universitario La Paz
José Juan Pozo Kreilinger
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Anatomía Patológica
Hospital Universitario La Paz
José Ignacio Sánchez Méndez
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Ginecología y
Obstetricia
Profesor Asociado. Facultad de Medicina
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Laura Yébenes Gregorio
Médico Adjunto Especialista de Área en Anatomía Patológica
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Strategic Objective
Ovarian carcinoma is the most significant cause of gynaecological cancer-related mortality in Western societies.
However, classical parameters are imperfect predictors of outcome for ovarian carcinoma, which may be due to the molecular genetic events underlying the complexity of ovarian neoplasms and the fact that they are poorly understood. Precise prognostic factors based on gene expression may identify patients who are more likely to die of the disease despite their response to standard treatment.
Angiogenesis is a complex and highly regulated process that consists of the development of new vessels originating from pre-existing ones. In ovarian cancer, increased angiogenesis is associated with rapid recurrence and decreased survival. The main goal of this subline, therefore, is to identify angiogenesis related gene expression profiles with prognostic and predictive value in patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma.
Subline breast cancer C-Src is overexpressed and/or hyper-activated in breast carcinoma tissue of human biopsies. In xenografts of human breast cancer cell lines, the relevance of SRC in mammary tumorigenesis and in bone metastasis has been demonstrated.
Our studies on genetically modified human breast cancer cells in culture, in xenograft and in genetically modified mice may establish the relevance of the scaffold SFKs function in breast cancer. In addition, our work may lead to the development of new prognosis and diagnosis tools and therapeutic regimens to improve breast cancer treatment.
Research Lines
• Molecular basis of breast and gynaecological cancer
• Molecular basis of head and neck cancer
• Biomarker identification in sarcomas
• Resistance mechanisms associated to EMT and angiogenesis