Presentación    
OTO-NEUROSURGERY RESEARCH
Composition
Name
Position
Institution
Luis Lassaletta Atienza
Jefe de Sección de Otorrinolaringología
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Carolina Alfonso Carrillo
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Otorrinolaringología
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Miryam Calvino Fernández
Investigadora Postdoctoral
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Alejandro Castro Calvo
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Otorrinolaringología
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Isabel García López
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Otorrinolaringología
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Javier Gavilán Bouzas
Jefe de Servicio de Otorrinolaringología
Catedrático. Departamento de Cirugía. Facultad de Medicina
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Teresa González Otero
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Cirugía Maxilofacial
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Silvia Murillo Cuesta
Investigadora Postdoctoral
IIB "Alberto Sols"
Carolina Peña Granero
Técnico de Laboratorio (Contrato PTA)
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Rosa María Pérez Mora
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Otorrinolaringología
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Juan Antonio Rey Herranz
Investigador Senior (Contrato MIguel Servet - I2)
Jefe de Laboratorio
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Laura del Río Arroyo
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Otorrinolaringología
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Lourdes Rodríguez de la Rosa
Técnico de Laboratorio
IIB "Alberto Sols"
Isabel Pilar Sánchez Cuadrado
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Otorrinolaringología
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Miguel Torres Martín
Investigador Postdoctoral
Hospital Universitario La Paz
María Isabel Varela Nieto
Profesor de Investigación
IIB "Alberto Sols"
Antonio Villalobo Polo
Profesor de Investigación
IIB "Alberto Sols"
 
Strategic Objective
The systematic use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has dramatically increased the diagnosis of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS). The majority of patients with VS complain of hypoacusis or tinnitus, and very few present more debilitating symptoms. Therefore, the approach with a patient with VS is complex because the treatment of the tumour is directed towards avoiding complications arising from its growth and not necessarily towards improving the patient’s quality of life. Currently, there are no factors that allow us to predict the growth of vestibular schwannoma.
Recent advances in the field of oncogenetics have allowed us to better understand the development of VS.
The study of the correlation between clinical variables related to the biological behaviour of VS and its genetic and epigenetic disorders aims to find the factors that predict the behaviour of VS. This will help us identify patients who need active treatment of the tumour and avoid the morbidity associated with the treatment in those who do not need it.
The cochlear implant (CI) is currently the only solution for relieving the condition in patients with severe or profound hypoacusis who do not benefit from a prosthetic adaptation with a conventional hearing aid. It is estimated that there are currently 120,000 adults in Spain with profound sensorineural hypoacusis. In recent years, new hearing implants have been developed including osseointegrated implants and active middle ear implants. It´s excellent and often spectacular results and its low rate of complications have transformed CI from an innovative technology in the experimental phase to a routine, safe and effective procedure, capable of returning deaf individuals to the hearing world and ending their isolation.
Moderate to severe hypoacusis is one of the most prevalent medical problems. Ciliated sensory cells and neurons do not regenerate in mammals, which is the main cause of sensorineural deafness. Mutations causing deficiencies in the levels of the insulin like growth factor I (IGF-I) also cause sensorineural deafness in humans and mice. IGFI is an essential factor in the postnatal development of mammals, and its level decreases with ageing. We are studying the participation of IGF-I in the development of the inner ear and in the pathophysiology of hearing in adults, as well as, the molecular signalling networks conferring specificity in the otic cellular response to IGF-I. We are studying the signals that regulate otic development and also those involved in otic damage with the objective of identifying the key factors implicated in functional repair and regeneration of inner ear cells In short, our work contributes to the study of auditory pathophysiology, with the ultimate objective of investigating the potential clinical usefulness of IGF-I in human hypoacusis originating in the cochlea.
Research Lines
• Tumors of the CNS: vestibular schwannoma, meningiomas, gliomas, and other: surgery, oncogenetics, quality of life, etc.
• Auditory implants: cochlear implants, middle ear implants, bone-conduction implants: surgical aspects, telephone use, quality of life, perception of music, etc.
• IGF-I deficiency: a rare syndromic human deafness.
• Neurobiology of hearing: molecular and cellular bases of hearing loss of different aetiology (exposición a ruido, malnutrición, ototóxicos). Identification of transcriptional networks.
• Development of experimental models of blindeafness for pre-clinical studies with potential therapeutic molecules, thus identifying possible therapeutic targets, potential markers for diagnosis and generation of vital guidelines.
• Head and Neck tumors and voice pathology.
• The role of celular senescence in the development of the inner ear and the audithory pathology.
• Studies on three systems implicated in the development of tumor metastasis: the tyrosine kinase receptor ErbB2; the non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Src; and the adaptor protein Grb7.