Presentación    
LYMPHOCYTE PATHOPHYSIOLOGY IN IMMUNODEFICIENCIES
Composition
Name
Composition
Institution
Eduardo López Granados
Coordinador de Inmunología
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Rita Francisca Álvarez Doforno
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Inmunología
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Francisco Javier Alves Ferreira
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Anatomía Patológica
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Lucía del Pino Molina
Investigadora Predoctoral
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Antonio Ferreira Cerdán
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Inmunología
Hospital Universitario La Paz
María Cruz García Rodríguez
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Inmunología
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Julia Leal de la Rosa
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Pediatría General
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Montserrat Lozano Doncel
Técnico de Laboratorio
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Diego Plaza López de Sabando
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Hemato-Oncología Pediátrica
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Ángel Julián Robles Marhuenda
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Medicina Interna
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Rebeca Rodríguez Pena
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Inmunología
Hospital Universitario La Paz
María Carmen Salcedo Moreno
Técnico de Laboratorio
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Ana Sastre Urguelles
Facultativo Especialista de Área en Hemato-Oncología Pediátrica
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Esther Tato Gutiérrez
Técnico de Laboratorio
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Juan Manuel Torres Canizales
Médico Interno Residente en Inmunología
Hospital Universitario La Paz
Strategic Objective
Defective molecular events driving the differentiation, activation and homeostasis of lymphocytes underline the pathophysiology of numerous immunological and haematological diseases. In primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs), intrinsic impairments of immune cells lead to infection and, in some cases, autoimmunity and cancer.
Common variable immunodeficiency disorders (CVIDs) are the most frequent but least understood types of PID and are a major focus of our research.
Our group attempts to unravel the molecular basis for functional defects of lymphocytes in several PIDs as well as the basis for autoimmune and lymphoproliferative complications. We take a multidisciplinary clinical, anatomic, genetic, epigenetic and functional approach. By correlating clinical and experimental data, we aim to achieve a better understanding of the syndromes and lay the groundwork for new, more effective treatments.
We have recently been concentrating our efforts on understanding differentiation and survival cell signalling pathways and the control of gene transcription in B cells from affected individuals. The B cell receptor (BCR), the TNF-R family members and the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are fundamental to the synergistic action of B cell function. It is increasingly evident that innate and adaptive pathways intersect and reinforce each other and that TLRs play a fundamental role in this relationship.
Methodological and conceptual approaches applied to the study of PIDs can be applied to monitoring more prevalent secondary immunodeficiency states such as immunological reconstitution in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), acute viral infection, and use of immunosuppressive treatments in transplantation and autoimmunity. We validate new biological markers and assays for a patient-based rather than a disease-based therapeutic approach in the latest clinical scenarios, to facilitate clinical decisions and to maximise the clinical efficiency and safety of treatments.
Research Lines
• The study of the anatomical, genetic, epigenetic and biochemical bases for lymphoid function deficiency in immunodeficiencies of antibody formation and their autoimmune and lymphoproliferative complications
• Role of Toll Like Receptors (TLRs) and signalling pathways in lymphoid maturation and immune response to infection in primary immunodeficiencies
• Identification of new biomarkers for lymphoid function for monitoring in states of immunodeficiency secondary to: acute viral infection, immune reconstitution after
transplantation of haematopoietic progenitors and use of immunosuppressive therapies in transplantation, autoimmunity and chronic inflammation